Frequently Asked Questions

                                                                Frequently Asked Questions

General 

1. Why do I need a consultation, I already consulted with my dentist?

– We will need to go over your health history, take new x-rays if needed, discuss anesthesia options, suggest treatment, and meet with our financial coordinator to go over insurance benefits.

 2. I am pregnant, is it safe to have oral surgery?

– Yes, only emergency oral surgery will be performed under local anesthesia. You will be required to bring with you a clearance form from your OBGYN doctor. You may also have it faxed to our office.

 Extractions

 1. What can I eat after my surgery?

– You will be on a soft food diet for 4-6 days. For example yogurt, mashed potatoes, soup, eggs, shakes, etc. But you cannot drink out of a straw, this can cause a dry sock-it. Please view our Pinterest account for food options and advice.

Pinterest Name: CaliforniaOMS

 2. Can I exercise after my procedure?

– No, you cannot exercise for a week, or as advised by doctor.

3. Is it normal to be more swollen a few days after my tooth extractions?

– Yes, swelling peaks in 48-72 hours after surgery. Ice has minimal effects after 36 hours except to ease the pain. Maintaining an upright position during the night may help to decrease the amount and duration of swelling.

4. How  long should I expect the bleeding to continue?

– Bleeding subsides in 24 hours, though oozing may continue off and on for a few days. If bleeding continues, bite on a gauze or a teabag. Do not hesitate to call the doctors if bleeding continues.

5. It has been 3 to 4 days after my extraction and the pain is getting worse, what should I do?

– Call the office to make an appointment for a follow up. A very painful condition known as “dry-socket” may develop 3-4 days following tooth removal. Common symptoms are a steady increase in pain, throbbing at the extraction site, ear pain on the side the tooth was removed, and a bad taste or odor in your mouth. Treatment involves placing medication into the socket that will ease your pain until the body heals itself.

6. The stitches have fallen out and it has only been a few days after my extraction, should I worry?

– Stitches often fall out at various time intervals due to various reasons, that is why multiple stitches are often placed. Our stitches dissolve on their own, and the wound takes 4-6 weeks to heal.

Implants

1. I can see a silver cap in my gums where the implant was place, is it normal?

– Not to worry. The silver cap is called a healing abutment. They are placed above the gums intentionally. You can brush the cap as your normally brush your teeth.

2. When can I eat on the side of my mouth where the implant was placed?

– Six weeks! For the first six weeks please eat a softer diet on the opposite site of implant placement. If implants were placed on both sides, then your diet must be restricted to pureed soft foods (ex: eggs, tuna, salad, egg salad, cottage cheese, soft pasta, fish, etc).

3. The silver cap that my doctor placed is loose, what should I do?

– Call for an appointment. If left loose, gum tissues may grow between the implant and the healing abutment, necessitating an additional minor procedure under local anesthesia.

Bone grafting

1. When can I eat on the side of my mouth that the bone graft was placed?

 – Six weeks! For the first six weeks please eat a softer diet on the opposite site of Bone graft placement. If Bone graft was placed on both sides, then your diet must be restricted to pureed soft foods (ex: eggs, tuna, salad, egg salad, cottage cheese, soft pasta, fish, etc).

2. I wear a denture or partial denture, can I use them after the bone graft?

– Each bone graft is very different. Please always ask the doctors before placing a denture onto a site that a bone graft has been placed.

3. I had a tooth removal ad bone graft placed in the tooth socket, now I see a hole with white material?

– When bone graft is placed in a tooth socket after extraction, a collagen plug is placed over it to provide protection. This initially protects the bone graft and then dissolves and is replaced by your gum tissues. This event may occur 3-5 days after the extraction leaving a “crater-appearance” in the tooth socket. This is normal. Eat on the opposite site, and if you have any questions please do not hesitate to call our doctors.

General Anesthesia:

1. How long prior to my general anesthesia must I not eat or drink?

– You may not eat or drink anything for 6 hours prior to your general anesthesia. If you must take medication do so with a tiny sip of water 2 hours or more prior to your procedure.

2. How soon after the general anesthesia can I drive?

– You should not drive a motor vehicle or operate heavy machinery for 24 hours after your procedure. This time is necessary to allow your body to metabolize the anesthetic agents.